Woman Aflame 1980

BRONZE, ED. 2/8
360 cm H
LOCATION
G/F LANDMARK ATRIUM
FLOOR PLAN
artist picture
Salvador Dali

1904-1989

Salvador Dali was a prominent surrealist painter and one of the most recognised and ground breaking artists of his time.  Dali was born in the small agricultural town of Figueres in Catalonia, Spain. A precocious and intelligent child, Dali was encouraged by his parents to practise art from an early age.  His mother especially indulged his creative interests and early eccentricities.  Dali also spent his boyhood summers in the coastal fishing village of Cadaqués where his parents built his first art studio.

He began his formal training in Madrid, attending the San Fernando Royal Academy of Fine Arts.  In the 1920s, Dali went to Paris and struck up friendships with other iconic artists including Picasso, Magritte and Miro, leading to his first surrealist phase during which he soon became a leader of the movement. Throughout his life he drew on eccentricity and exhibitionism, claiming these to be the source of his creative energy.

He was a skilled draftsman, known for striking bizarre images in his surrealist works.  Dali is probably best known for his painting ‘The Persistence of Memory’ featuring his iconic images of melting clocks.  Dali also created works in an expansive repertoire of other mediums including film, photography and sculpture, often collaborating with a range of other artists.

Dali’s sculptures, ‘Lobster Telephone’ and ‘Mae West Lips Sofa’, were two of the most popular objects of the surrealist movement.  His ‘Woman Aflame’ statue, on permanent display here at Landmark, was adapted from his famous 1937 painting ‘Burning Giraffe’.   This striking piece alludes to Dali’s obsession with the mysteries of women and Sigmund Freud’s research on dream interpretations.  This sculpture provides the viewer with a unique opportunity to explore infinite possibilities and momentarily escape from the hustle and bustle of CENTRAL. 


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